Wednesday, March 30, 2016

"Bees don't have teeth."

I remember watching Sherlock Holmes when I was 8 years old. Basil Rathbone played the great detective when I first saw him on the screen. The first ever story I read about him was the Hound of the Baskervilles, which was a junior version of the story my mum got me for my 8th or 9th birthday. Ever since then, I have been hooked on the detective and have watched many depictions of him on the screen, and read the books and stories of course. The best Sherlock Holmes in my opinion was played by Jeremy Brett, although Robert Downey Jr. is also quite good. When I heard that Ian McKellen would play an aged version of the man, I decided that would be delightful, and that is exactly what Mr. Holmes is in my opinion. Of course Ian McKellen shines as the timeless detective giving him both wit, humor, and great emotional depth, which was not something the character was keen on displaying most or any of the time. Laura Linney played the housekeeper Mrs. Munro, who was an interesting character, and someone I don't think they fleshed out as well as they could have, but she added a type of restraint and realism to the elderly Mr. Holmes' desires. Her son Roger, played by Milo Parker, was such a great contrast to not only the character of Holmes but to McKellen's great acting as well. The two of them paired together was refreshingly delightful and was how the film worked. These three formed the core of the film and there were some other supporting actors and actresses who did very well, one of which was Hiroyuki Sanada, who's had large roles in The Last Samurai and The Wolverine. In this film Sherlock Holmes is trying to remember his last case and why it so adversely affected him to the point he retreated from the world. His housekeeper and her son help him with his bees, and tend to him as he pieces together his last case which was so many years ago. Bill Condon did a fine job of directing the film, although his track record of films he's directed hasn't been very good. The writing and screenplay were pretty good by Jeffrey Hatcher as he adapted it from the novel written by Mitch Cullin, but I have to be honest and say that some parts dragged and things were occasionally boring. Mostly though, my attention was kept with very little distraction. Carter Burwell did a fine job on the music, but there wasn't anything that was overly memorable. The film was beautifully shot though; such exquisite cinematography by Tobias A. Schliessler, it really captured the beauty of the English countryside, and the refined interior of upper class London. All in all it was very lovely film and suited for children and family viewing alike. Definitely will watch it again, but it's not my favorite Sherlock Holmes to watch...that would be Jeremy Brett. Been busy writing the lyrics of my musical and so far so good, although much work remains to turn them into amazing songs, but the groundwork is there. I think I only have six more to go before I start writing the book. After that, who knows. I wish I could say ignore the news, but it really does seem like things are getting worse and worse on planet earth everywhere, and all of the people who should be inspiring are just merely saying how horrible things are. Not very comforting or helpful.

Mr. Holmes trailer

Ian McKellen on playing Sherlock Holmes

Jeremy Brett as Sherlock Holmes (some good moments from the BBC series)

No comments:

Post a Comment